Tag Archives: Neelaphaijit

Thanks to DSI, no justice for Phra Supoj

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“You can conclude that it was a mistake for us to have the [Department of Special Investigation] take over this case. Just like the case of Somchai Neelaphaijit, or the murder of Charoen Wat-Aksorn. None of these cases has made any progress. It is a failure of the agencies and the personnel working on these cases.”

(“อาจจะสรุปได้ว่า เป็นความผิดพลาดที่เราให้ ดีเอสไอ มารับคดีนี้ เช่นเดียวกับ คดีของทนายสมชาย นีละไพจิตร หรือกรณีคดีการฆ่าคุณเจริญ วัดอักษร ซึ่งทุกคดีล้วนไม่มีความคืบหน้า เป็นความล้มเหลวของหน่วยงาน และบุคลากรที่ทำอยู่”)

– Phra Kittisak Kittisophano on the unsolved murder of fellow monk Phra Supoj Suwajo

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Protest a more serious crime in Thailand than killing

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Hundreds of people blockaded the National Assembly in Bangkok on Dec. 12, where the unelected legislature, consisting largely of serving and former military officers and bureaucrats, was set to pass a flurry of highly regressive bills before stepping down next year. The protestors called on them to wait for an elected government so the proposed laws could be debated.

Afterwards, police officers said they would consider prosecuting people who climbed the building’s fences and went inside. They accused some of kicking and punching government officials and said that they could be charged with trespass, coercion, upsetting the peace, confinement and damaging public property, among other things.

This sounds familiar. The same bundle of offences is pulled out every time demonstrators and police collide in Thailand.

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Pat prescriptions don’t correct abuse

A leading international human rights group released a report on Thailand a couple of weeks ago. The report was accurate, yet it said nothing new. The contents were unoriginal. The recommendations were predictable: that the government should join international treaties, make new domestic law, investigate and prosecute perpetrators of abuse, compensate victims, support human rights defenders and cooperate with the United Nations.

These are all good things to recommend. The problem is that they made no contribution to the debate on human rights in Thailand. They could have been written about any country by anybody sitting anywhere. What government shouldn’t comply with international law? Which perpetrators shouldn’t be prosecuted? What more can and must be said?

International organizations based in London, Geneva or New York have proved inadequate for the task of assessing and reporting on the increasingly complex human rights problems across Asia. Shallow diagnoses, spotty campaigns and oversimplified remedies have contributed little and sometimes caused harm.

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