Tag Archives: NHRC

Consistently counter-productive

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Extracts from a new report: Human Rights under Attack, by the Working Group on Justice for Peace, Thailand

One policy that has been consistently counter-productive is the government’s reliance on poorly trained, ill-disciplined para-military forces and civilian militias. Although they have a long-standing history in Thailand, since 2004 their strength in the South has been increased massively. There is a confusing multiplicity of groups – the paramilitary rangers, an interior ministry force known as the Volunteer Defence Corps, several loosely supervised village volunteer forces and an unknown number of smaller sectarian militias – added to the regular army, police and border patrol police. The largest armed force in the South is a civilian militia consisting of Village Defence Volunteers recruited under the Internal Security Operations Command and the Village Protection Force recruited under Queen Sirikit’s direction tasked with protecting Buddhist communities. Continue reading

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Who should be the NHRC?

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“Who should be a member of the NHRC [of Thailand]? According to the 2007 Constitution

‘The National Human Rights Commission consists of a president and six other members appointed by the King with the advice of the Senate from persons having apparent knowledge and experience in the protection of the rights and liberties of the people, having regard also to the participation of representatives from private organizations in the field of human rights.‘ (Section 256)

So who do you think fits these qualities? Please give your comments, and in the coming days and weeks we’ll use this blog to find the right people for the job…”

“ใครควรเป็นกรรมการสิทธิฯ — Who should be the rights commission?” blog

Strange fruit in Kalasin

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(ผลไม้ประหลาดในกาฬสินธุ์)

Officers of the Kalasin District Police Station in northeastern Thailand are alleged to have abducted and murdered dozens of people in the last few years. The actual number could exceed 100; many more bodies have been found, but were not properly examined and documented before being cremated.

Among the victims, Kietisak Thitboonkrong and Krischadol Pancha disappeared from the police station within days of each other in July 2004, shortly after the official close of the first “war on drugs” declared by former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

Kietisak was 17, Krischadol, 15. Both had been accused of robbery and brought to the police station. Both were granted bail and the grandmother of each had come to the station to collect the boy but was told that he had been released and to go and wait.

Neither ever came home. Kietisak was found in a neighboring province, tortured to death and strung up in a bad attempt at a simulated suicide. Krischadol was not found. Continue reading